Archive for the ‘bike rules’ Category

June 30, 2013 00

Following on from my last post about road rules, this week we are looking at all the cycling rules when cycling in bike lanes, cycleways, shared paths etc and what do all those signs mean? Bike lanes These are separated, marked spaces on the road especially for cyclists. And if there is one of these, by […]

Following on from my last post about road rules, this week we are looking at all the cycling rules when cycling in bike lanes, cycleways, shared paths etc and what do all those signs mean?

Bike lanes

bike lane sign

These are separated, marked spaces on the road especially for cyclists. And if there is one of these, by law you must use it if it’s practical to do so, i.e. if there is a truck parked over it, it may not be practical to do so. Just use your common sense. Watch for pedestrians and car doors opening. They look like the photo below –

bike lane image

Separated cycleways

separated cycleway sign

These are dedicated lanes for bike riders, separated from other vehicles and pedestrians by a kerb. You have priority on a cycleway but be careful as drivers and pedestrians are still about and may not see you. Make sure you give way where a give way sign or logo is displayed and give way to pedestrians on crossings.

Separated cycleways look like this:

separated cycleway

When the cycleway ends or changes, you may have to merge with other traffic and share the road with vehicles. Be aware of the change and take care.

Shared paths

shared path sign

These are often in parks and on some footpaths, shared paths are for cyclists and people walking. Pedestrians have priority here and you must give way to them.

shared path image

Bike only contra-flow lanes

This enables cyclists to travel on roads that are marked one way for other vehicles – i.e. you can ride along it in the opposite direction. You do not have to use this lane, and may instead use the traffic lane and travel in the same direction as traffic. They look like this:

contra flow bike lane

Look out for part 3 of road rules where we will explore what you can get fined for – yes you can get fined on a bike!

Happy cycling!

BikeGal.com

May 31, 2013 6

Seems like everywhere you go these days there are some kind of rules.  And just like everything else, there are cycling rules and road rules that apply to cyclists in New South Wales. I thought it might be worthwhile, blogging on exactly what these are so we all know the rules and our rights on […]

Seems like everywhere you go these days there are some kind of rules.  And just like everything else, there are cycling rules and road rules that apply to cyclists in New South Wales.

I thought it might be worthwhile, blogging on exactly what these are so we all know the rules and our rights on the road.  Particularly if like me, you sat for your driver’s licence test about a million years ago and you are a bit rusty on the detail.

bike pic

If you want to brush up on the details  – go here:

http://www.bicycleinfo.nsw.gov.au/get_riding/nsw_road_rules.html

Cyclists are required by law to:

  • Wear a helmet – worn at all times when riding a bike
  • Have front and rear lights – must be fitted and used if riding at night
  • Have a bell or horn – fitted and in working order
  • Obey all road rules including stopping at red lights and stop signs
  • Use signed and marked bike lanes where available

Contrary to what anyone tells you, as a bike rider on the road you can:

  • Pass other vehicles on the left, except when those vehicles are indicating and turning left
  • Travel to the front line of traffic on the left hand side of stopped vehicles (again, except when those vehicles are indicating and turning left)
  • Take up a whole traffic lane (yes, a whole lane)
  • Ride a maximum of two abreast in a lane, not more than 1.5 metres apart
  • Cycle in bus lanes and transit lanes (but not bus only lanes)
  • Ride on footpaths that are designated shared paths
If there is bike lane available - use it!

If there is bike lane available – use it!

And what you CAN NOT do – ride on footpaths – unless you are under 12 years of age, accompanying a rider under 12 or again the footpath is a designated shared path. What’s a designated shared path? Click here for more info http://sydneycycleways.net/the-network/types-of-cycleways/shared-path

Next week…. Rules for riding in bike lanes, separated cycle ways, shared paths, shoulder lanes, mixed traffic lanes – oh the list is endless! So many rules, so little time.

Happy cycling!

BikeGal.com